Renewables: 99% of new generating capacity in January

February 24, 2014

Here comes 6Kenneth Bossong at the SUN DAY campaign reports:

According to the latest “Energy Infrastructure Update” report from the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission’s Office of Energy Projects, non-hydro renewable energy sources (i.e., biomass, geothermal, solar, wind) accounted for more than 99% of all new domestic electrical generating capacity installed during January 2014 for a total of 324 MW.

No, it’s not a huge number in absolute terms.  No, it won’t hold up in percentage terms.  But yes, it is a glimpse into the future if we’re going to leave a recognizable one.

Every day brings more reasons for confidence that we can make it better, more confirmation that continuing to make it worse is as unnecessary as it is wrong.

With due exception for some geothermal, the future is not, as Van Jones says, down those holes.  It’s up!

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Source:  The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission released its most recent 4-page “Energy Infrastructure Update,” with data through January 31, 2014, on February 20, 2014. See the tables titled “New Generation In-Service (New Build and Expansion)” and “Total Installed Operating Generating Capacity” at http://www.ferc.gov/legal/staff-reports/2014/jan-infrastructure.pdf


Velkommen to solutions: Going all the way in Copenhagen

June 7, 2012

Was it the end of a world hopelessly tangled in geopolitical futility?  Or the beginning of a world that might heal as a distributed, connected organism?  The logo for the 2009 Copenhagen climate summit (enhanced here with bike love) was prophetic, because it evoked both.

COP-15 may well be remembered as humanity’s big missed chance.  But the Danes aren’t just hanging around crying in their Tuborgs.

They’re riding their bikes on “cycle superhighways.”  They’re retrofitting their buildings.   They’re building wind turbines and mounting solar panels.

Copenhagen has already reduced its carbon emissions 40% since 1990, on their way to zero net carbon by 2025.  Here’s the plan, and a good Climate Wire piece in Scientific American on how it’s being implemented.

Hopenhagen lives!